December 7, 2021

Rare Diseases SA: Would you swear for charity?

Simply “giving a f**k can make the world of difference to rare disease patients in South Africa,” it argues. 

Swear for charity on 30 November

Swear for charity on 30 November photo credit: Business Insider

Charity organization Rare Diseases SA wants you to swear in the office on 30 November and then pay for it.

In 2019, Rare Diseases SA urged supporters to “annoy your colleagues until they lose their sh*t and then make them pay”. This year, Rare Diseases SA is touting virtual swear jars, for those working remotely or in hybrid setups.

The proceeds from these swear jars will go towards “a procurement fund for high cost medicine for patients impacted by rare disease”, the organization says, with the hope to eventually hit R100 million. Rare Diseases SA intends to set up a risk equalization fund, providing much better access to healthcare for people with rare conditions who are sometimes told potentially life-saving medicines are simply too expensive.

The premise is simple: swear, pay up and donate the combined cash while spreading the word under the banner #SwearToCare. If you are offended by swearing, Rare Diseases SA will use it as a lobbying opportunity.

“Are you offended? Well, so are we!” says the organisation, in anticipation of complaints about foul language. “We are offended that in South Africa, we have no formalised Rare Diseases policy. We are offended that our government and medical aids are turning a blind eye to the thousands of patients impacted by a rare disease.”

Simply “giving a f**k can make the world of difference to rare disease patients in South Africa,” it argues. 

Rare Diseases SA stated that millions of South Africans live with untreated or undiagnosed conditions for which treatments costs are effectively impossible to pay.

Sources: Business Insider

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