October 18, 2021

How to support your teenager

Spend time with your teenager. Make yourself available to talk when your child expresses interest in doing so. 

How to support your teenager

How to support your teenager

Adolescence can be hard on both parents and children. Teens become easily frustrated when their parents fail to comprehend the tornado of hormones, pressures, and developing independence in which they find themselves swirling.

Here is how you can understand and support your teenager better

Spend time with your teenager. Make yourself available to talk when your child expresses interest in doing so. 

Stay involved in your teen’s everyday life. Make the effort to ask questions about activities and events. Follow your child’s sports team or attend performances.

Offer your child some time alone. Teenagers need time to themselves to process the many changes they’re going through.

Affirm your child. Teenagers benefit from positive reinforcement, and lots of it, as they grapple with forming their own, independent identity. Tell them when you are proud of them. Praise positive behaviour. 

Show your love. Your teenager may be acting unlovable. Your teen may even be feeling that he or she is unlovable. Your job as a parent is to love them no matter what. Leave a note, give a hug, or speak words of love to your child every day.

Remember that your teenager’s brain is still developing. Humans’ frontal lobe, the part of the brain responsible for impulse control, judgment, and decision-making, doesn’t fully mature until we are in our early 20’s. Your child’s brain is quite literally still under construction.

Recognize that hormones have a significant impact upon mood. Your child’s moody behaviour has a physiological foundation. Puberty hormones flush often-overwhelming levels of chemical input through your child’s developing brain.

Remind yourself that your child isn’t enjoying being moody. Your child is struggling to cope with the confluence of hormonal change, body changes, developing identity, pressure from friends, and a developing sense of independence.

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